Effective Learning of Japanese- Part2 (Scientific Theories)

From the Vendors’ Pages

Stock-Images-Separator-GraphicsFairy31

Enter your name & email (at the top right) to participate in a 6 day FREE trial

Stock-Images-Separator-GraphicsFairy31

 

The secret to successfully mastering any language is to know the KEY strategies that MUST be used. These tactics have been developed and refined by the vendor.

The vendor combined:

1. Three scientifically proven theories of learning;
2. 7 proven language acquisition success strategies; and
3. Advances in e-learning & technology…

The system can ensure that you will be able to master Japanese no matter what your prior experiences.

Scientific Theory 1 of Learning:
——————————–
The chunking process by Dr. George A. Miller

“The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on Our Capacity for Processing Information” is a keynote paper in psychology. It was published in 1956 by George A. Miller, Princeton University’s Department of Psychology (Psychological Review). It is often argued that the number of objects an average human can hold in working memory is
7 plus or minus 2. This is referred to as “Miller’s Law.”

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Magical_Number_Seven,_Plus_or_Minus_Two

Scientific Theory 2 of Learning:
——————————–
The theory of 2nd language acquisition by Dr. Stephen Krashen

Dr. Krashen has published over 400 papers, in the fields of second-language acquisition, bilingual education, and reading. He pioneered important concepts and terms in the study of second-language acquisition like:
the natural order hypothesis;
the monitor hypothesis,
the affective filter,
the acquisition-learning hypothesis,
the input hypothesis….

Recently, Dr Krashen promoted the use of free voluntary reading during second-language acquisition, which he says “is the most powerful tool we have in language education….”

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Krashen

Scientific Theory 3 of Learning:
——————————–
The VARK model by Neil Fleming

One of the most common categorization of learning styles is Fleming’s VARK model which improved upon earlier Neuro-linguistic programming (VARK) models:

visual learners;
auditory learners;
reading-writing preference learners;
kinesthetic learners or tactile learners.[22]

Fleming claimed that visual learners have a preference for seeing, thinking in pictures; visual aids that represent ideas, using these methods other than words.

Auditory learners best learn through listening.

Tactile/kinesthetic learners prefer to learn via experience—moving, touching, and doing; actual, active exploration of the world.

These discoveries helps teachers to be aware and helo prepare classes that address each of these areas. Students can also use the models to identify their preferred learning style and maximize their educational experience by focusing on what benefits them the most naturally.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_styles#Neil_Fleming.27s_VAK.2FVARK_model

 

… To be continued in the next blog!

Stock-Images-Separator-GraphicsFairy31

Enter your name & email (at the top right) to participate in a 6 day FREE trial

Stock-Images-Separator-GraphicsFairy31